No storm in a teacup – it’s a cyclone on a silicon chip

University of Queensland researchers have combined quantum liquids and silicon-chip technology to study turbulence for the first time, opening the door to new navigation technologies and improved understanding of the turbulent dynamics of cyclones and other extreme weather. Professor Warwick Bowen, from UQ’s Precision Sensing Initiative and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems said … Read more No storm in a teacup – it’s a cyclone on a silicon chip

Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question

When a fluid, such as water or air, flows fast enough, it will experience turbulence – seemingly random changes in velocity and pressure within the fluid. Turbulence is extremely difficult to study but is important for many fields of engineering, such as air flow past wind turbines or jet engines. Understanding turbulence better would allow … Read more Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question

Order from chaos: Australian vortex studies are first proof of decades-old theory

Two Australian studies published this week offer the first proof of a 70-year-old theory of turbulence. “The studies confirm a seminal theory of the formation of large-scale vortices from turbulence in 2D fluid flow, where the large vortices emerge from an apparent chaos of smaller vortices,” says author Prof Matt Davis, FLEET’s lead on the … Read more Order from chaos: Australian vortex studies are first proof of decades-old theory