Genetics may determine who benefits from broccoli’s effects on kidney health

New research indicates that the benefits of a dietary compound on kidney health may depend on an individual’s genetics. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of JASN, may be helpful for tailoring interventions to prevent or treat kidney disease. Glutathione S-transferase mu-1 (GSTM1) is an enzyme that plays a role in ridding the … Read more

Study finds prehistoric humans ate bone marrow like canned soup 400,000 years ago

Tel Aviv University researchers, in collaboration with scholars from Spain, have uncovered evidence of the storage and delayed consumption of animal bone marrow at Qesem Cave near Tel Aviv, the site of many major discoveries from the late Lower Paleolithic period some 400,000 years ago. The research provides direct evidence that early Paleolithic people saved … Read more

Microsatellite data can help double impact of agricultural interventions

Data from microsatellites can be used to detect and double the impact of sustainable interventions in agriculture at large scales, according to a new study led by the University of Michigan. By being able to detect the impact and target interventions to locations where they will lead to the greatest increase or yield gains, satellite … Read more

Study champions inland fisheries as rural nutrition hero

Synthesizing new data and assessment methods is showing how freshwater fish is an invisible superhero in the global challenge to feed poor rural populations in many areas of the world. But there’s a problem: Invisibility is the wrong superpower. Researchers from Michigan State University (MSU) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United … Read more

Poor water quality linked to sugary drink consumption in regional and remote Australia

Consumption of sugary drinks is common among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infants and toddlers, and it could be down to water quality, according to a study from The Australian National University (ANU). Lead author, Dr Katie Thurber, says there are clear opportunities to improve nutrition for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, as well … Read more

Scientists discover why brown fat is good for people’s health

Rutgers and other scientists have discovered how brown fat, also known as brown adipose tissue, may help protect against obesity and diabetes. Their study in the journal Nature adds to our knowledge about the role of brown fat in human health and could lead to new medications for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes. Brown … Read more

Tiny ear bones help archaeologists piece together the past

Archaeologists from the University of Bradford have examined ear ossicles taken from the skeletons of 20 juveniles, excavated from an 18th and 19th century burial ground in Blackburn. They were chosen to represent those with and without dietary disease such as rickets and scurvy. These children, who were excavated by Headland Archaeology, were examined at … Read more

Ancient feces reveal how ‘marsh diet’ left Bronze Age Fen folk infected with parasites

New research published today in the journal Parasitology shows how the prehistoric inhabitants of a settlement in the freshwater marshes of eastern England were infected by intestinal worms caught from foraging for food in the lakes and waterways around their homes. The Bronze Age settlement at Must Farm, located near what is now the fenland city of … Read more

Apples, tea and moderation — the 3 ingredients for a long life

Consuming flavonoid-rich items such as apples and tea protects against cancer and heart disease, particularly for smokers and heavy drinkers, according to new research from Edith Cowan University (ECU). Researchers from ECU’s School of Medical and Health Sciences analysed data from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort that assessed the diets of 53,048 Danes … Read more