Computer-generated genomes

All organisms on our planet store the molecular blueprint of life in a DNA code within their genome. The digital revolution in biology, driven by DNA sequencing, enables us to read the genomes of the myriads of microbes and multi-cellular organisms that populate our world. Today, the DNA sequences of over 200,000 microbial genomes are … Read more Computer-generated genomes

Scientists solve structure enabling cyanobacteria to thrive in low light

Scientists have determined the structure of the protein complex that gives cyanobacteria their unique ability to convert weak, filtered sunlight into useable energy. Their findings could one day be used to engineer crops that thrive under low-light conditions. Tiny photosynthetic organisms that live virtually everywhere on earth, cyanobacteria helped to create an oxygen-rich atmosphere on … Read more Scientists solve structure enabling cyanobacteria to thrive in low light

Bionic jellyfish swim faster and more efficiently

Engineers at Caltech and Stanford University have developed a tiny prosthetic that enables jellyfish to swim faster and more efficiently than they normally do, without stressing the animals. The researchers behind the project envision a future in which jellyfish equipped with sensors could be directed to explore and record information about the ocean. Jellyfish use … Read more Bionic jellyfish swim faster and more efficiently

Cutting through fog with laser focus

Research from The University of Queensland aimed at controlling light in scattering materials, such as fog or biological tissues, will benefit future biomedical imaging and telecommunications. Optics researchers Dr Mickael Mounaix and Dr Joel Carpenter have found a new way of controlling how light travels through different materials at different times using optical fibres. “The … Read more Cutting through fog with laser focus

Poplars genetically modified not to harm air quality grow as well as non-modified trees

Field trials in the Northwest and Southwest show that poplar trees can be genetically modified to reduce negative impacts on air quality while leaving their growth potential virtually unchanged, says an Oregon State University researcher who collaborated on the study. The findings, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, are important because … Read more Poplars genetically modified not to harm air quality grow as well as non-modified trees

Oregon scientist shows possible path to improved bone-repair procedures

Researchers are moving closer to a new approach for improving spinal fusion procedures and repairing broken or defective bones that avoids an over-production of bone that commonly occurs in current treatments. In a preclinical study, researchers significantly reduced undesired bone growth outside of targeted repair areas in rat femurs by delivering a potent bone-forming protein … Read more Oregon scientist shows possible path to improved bone-repair procedures

New gel boosts cell survival in damaged brain tissue

A novel way to transplant cells using a ‘hydrogel’ offers new hope for people with brain injuries, Parkinson’s disease and stroke patients, according to researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) and Deakin University. The team’s new hydrogel significantly boosts stem cell treatments that target and regenerate damaged brain tissue. The hydrogel – a gel … Read more New gel boosts cell survival in damaged brain tissue

What happens to gold nanoparticles in cells?

Gold nanoparticles, which are supposed to be stable in biological environments, can be degraded inside cells. This research conducted by teams from the CNRS, l’Université de Paris, Sorbonne Université, and l’Université de Strasbourg will be published in PNAS on December 16 2019, and reveals the ability of cells to metabolize gold, which is nevertheless not essential for … Read more What happens to gold nanoparticles in cells?

KAUST’s plastic biosensor finds sweet success

An electronic biosensor powered using the glucose in bodily fluids has been developed by KAUST researchers. The device pairs an electron-transporting polymer with an enzyme that extracts electrons from its reaction with glucose to drive its circuitry. The plastic biosensor could act as a continuous monitor of key health indicators, such as blood sugar levels … Read more KAUST’s plastic biosensor finds sweet success

New way to make biomedical devices from silk yields better products with tunable qualities

Researchers led by engineers at Tufts University have developed a novel, significantly more efficient fabrication method for silk that allows them to heat and mold the material into solid forms for a wide range of applications, including medical devices. The end products have superior strength compared to other materials, have physical properties that can be … Read more New way to make biomedical devices from silk yields better products with tunable qualities