Life in Antarctica’s ice mirrors human disease

Using tens of thousands of genes mapped from across the genomes of a group of Antarctic fishes called notothenioids, a team of researchers is now challenging this paradigm, revealing that the massive amount of genetic change required for life in the Antarctic occurred long before the Antarctic cooled. These genetic changes not only have major … Read more Life in Antarctica’s ice mirrors human disease

Two new species of ‘tweezer-beaked hopping rats’ discovered in Philippines

Just about everybody loves peanut butter. We put it on sandwiches and in candy, we use it to trick our dogs into taking their heartworm pills, and, when we have to, we bait mouse traps with it. But, as scientists learned when trapping rodents in the mountains of the Philippines, peanut butter isn’t for everyone. … Read more Two new species of ‘tweezer-beaked hopping rats’ discovered in Philippines

Koala drinking stations can reduce impact of climate change

A long-held view that koalas get all their hydration from eating leaves has been overturned by new research published today from Dr Valentina Mella and colleagues at the University of Sydney. The study in PLOS ONE offers hope in the fight to conserve this threatened species, with researchers finding that koalas will regularly use artificial … Read more Koala drinking stations can reduce impact of climate change

Working landscapes can support diverse bird species

Privately-owned, fragmented forests in Costa Rica can support as many vulnerable bird species as can nearby nature reserves, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. The research suggests that working with landowners to conserve or restore forests on working landscapes can help protect wildlife. In Costa Rica, working landscapes include forest patches, … Read more Working landscapes can support diverse bird species

Sponges collect penguin, seal, and fish DNA from the water they filter

Just like humans leave DNA in the places we inhabit, water-dwelling animals leave DNA behind in the water column. In a paper published June 3 in the journal Current Biology, scientists report that sponges, which can filter 10,000 liters of water daily, catch DNA in their tissues as they filter-feed. This proof-of-concept study identified fish, … Read more Sponges collect penguin, seal, and fish DNA from the water they filter