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Nature Sustainability

Pavani Cherukupally  (University of Toronto; Imperial College London), Wei Sun (University of Toronto; Zhejiang University), Geoffrey A. Ozin , Amy M. Bilton, Chul B. Park, Annabelle P. Y. Wong (University of Toronto), Daryl R. Williams (Imperial College London)

University of Toronto

Posted by Rebecca Robbins
Becca is Deputy Chief Editor.
Contact: deputy@sciglow.com

Oil catching sponge

The work constitutes a new framework for developing surface-engineered sponges that address the variable pH-responsive wetting behavior of crude oil.

1 month ago by University of Toronto

The remediation of oil field effluents is a global challenge. For example, in the United States, over 15 billion barrels of oil-contaminated wastewater produced each year. Cherukupally and Sun et al. report an innovative surface engineered sponge that combines surface chemistry, pH-responsive surface charge, and multiscale roughness to enhance the surface wetting of the sponge.

Provided by University of Toronto

New leaf shapes for thale cress

23 May 2019

Their work constitutes a new framework for developing surface-engineered sponges that address the variable pH-responsive wetting behavior of crude oil. Also, it demonstrates the production of clean water by taking up about 90% of the oil droplets within 10 minutes. Moreover, the sponge releases the captured oil for reuse, enabling the circular economy. Their work published today in Nature Sustainability.