Scientists succeed in measuring electron spin qubit without demolishing it

A group of scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science in Japan have succeeded in taking repeated measurements of the spin of an electron in a silicon quantum dot (QD), without changing the spin in the process. This type of “non-demolition” measurement is important for creating quantum computers that are fault tolerant. Quantum … Read more Scientists succeed in measuring electron spin qubit without demolishing it

In leap for quantum computing, silicon quantum bits establish a long-distance relationship

Imagine a world where people could only talk to their next-door neighbor, and messages must be passed house to house to reach far destinations. Until now, this has been the situation for the bits of hardware that make up a silicon quantum computer, a type of quantum computer with the potential to be cheaper and … Read more In leap for quantum computing, silicon quantum bits establish a long-distance relationship

First chip-to-chip quantum teleportation harnessing silicon photonic chip fabrication

The development of technologies which can process information based on the laws of quantum physics are predicted to have profound impacts on modern society. For example, quantum computers may hold the key to solving problems that are too complex for today’s most powerful supercomputers, and a quantum internet could ultimately protect the worlds information from … Read more First chip-to-chip quantum teleportation harnessing silicon photonic chip fabrication

The coolest LEGO ® in the universe

For the first time, LEGO ® has been cooled to the lowest temperature possible in an experiment which reveals a new use for the popular toy. Its special properties mean it could be useful in the development of quantum computing. A world leading team of ultra-low temperature physicists at Lancaster University decided to place a … Read more The coolest LEGO ® in the universe

“Multicoloured” quantum light goes non-Gaussian

Quantum computers require a range of properties. First of all, we want them to be programmable to tackle a wide range of different problems. Furthermore, we also want them to be scalable, which means that we can put fundamental building blocks together to build a machine that can solve complex problems. Finally, we also want … Read more “Multicoloured” quantum light goes non-Gaussian

A memory effect at single-atom level

An international research group has observed new quantum properties on an artificial giant atom and has now published its results in the high-ranking journal Nature Physics. The quantum system under investigation apparently has a memory – a new finding that could be used to build a quantum computer. The research group, consisting of German, Swedish … Read more A memory effect at single-atom level

Johns Hopkins researchers discover material that could someday power quantum computer

Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers. “We’ve found that a certain superconducting material contains special properties that could be the building blocks for technology of the … Read more Johns Hopkins researchers discover material that could someday power quantum computer

New horizons for connecting future quantum computers into a quantum network

Researchers, led by Delft University of Technology, have made two steps in the conversion of quantum states between signals in the microwave and optical domains. This is of great interest for connecting future superconducting quantum computers into a global quantum network. This week they report on their findings in Nature Physics and in Physical Review … Read more New horizons for connecting future quantum computers into a quantum network

‘Poor man’s qubit’ can solve quantum problems without going quantum

It may still be decades before quantum computers are ready to solve problems that today’s classical computers aren’t fast or efficient enough to solve, but the emerging “probabilistic computer” could bridge the gap between classical and quantum computing. Engineers at Purdue University and Tohoku University in Japan have built the first hardware to demonstrate how … Read more ‘Poor man’s qubit’ can solve quantum problems without going quantum

Dartmouth and MIT research advances noise cancelling for quantum computers

A team from Dartmouth College and MIT has designed and conducted the first lab test to successfully detect and characterize a class of complex, “non-Gaussian” noise processes that are routinely encountered in superconducting quantum computing systems. The characterization of non-Gaussian noise in superconducting quantum bits is a critical step toward making these systems more precise. … Read more Dartmouth and MIT research advances noise cancelling for quantum computers