9,900-year-old Mexican female skeleton distinct from other early American settlers

A new skeleton discovered in the submerged caves at Tulum sheds new light on the earliest settlers of Mexico, according to a study published February 5, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Wolfgang Stinnesbeck from Universität Heidelberg, Germany. Humans have been living in Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula since at least the Late Pleistocene (126,000-11,700 years ago). … Read more 9,900-year-old Mexican female skeleton distinct from other early American settlers

New study shows exercise boosts working memory like caffeine

An innovative lab at Western University known for promoting exercise as a way to reduce tobacco cravings has translated their research and found that brisk walks – as short as 20 minutes – can compete with caffeine in terms of enhancing working memory. Working memory is the ability to store and manipulate information, in the … Read more New study shows exercise boosts working memory like caffeine

How do men and women store fat differently? Ask the fruit fly

When it comes to determining how women and men store fat differently, it turns out fruit flies may hold the key. People and fruit flies are astonishingly alike genetically. In fact, nearly 75 per cent of disease-causing genes in humans can be found in the fly in a similar form. In a new study, recently … Read more How do men and women store fat differently? Ask the fruit fly

Genomics experts dispute nine genes linked to congenital heart condition

Geneticists and heart specialists around the world had previously reported 17 genes to cause long QT syndrome, a little-known inherited heart condition. However, the Clinical Genome Resource’s (ClinGen) expert panel has critically reevaluated the scientific evidence for all 17 reported genes, disputing nine of the genes and revealing only three of the genes to be definitively … Read more Genomics experts dispute nine genes linked to congenital heart condition

Tendon stem cells could revolutionize injury recovery

The buildup of scar tissue makes recovery from torn rotator cuffs, jumper’s knee, and other tendon injuries a painful, challenging process, often leading to secondary tendon ruptures. New research led by Carnegie’s Chen-Ming Fan and published in Nature Cell Biology reveals the existence of tendon stem cells that could potentially be harnessed to improve tendon healing and … Read more Tendon stem cells could revolutionize injury recovery

A step in a new direction

Dr. Michael Fehlings, a Senior Scientist at the Krembil Research Institute, and his research team have discovered a network of nerve cells that plays a key role in controlling our ability to walk. The group’s findings, published in Nature Neuroscience, challenge conventional perceptions of how the brain instructs and regulates the body while walking. Although walking may … Read more A step in a new direction

Protein imaging at the speed of life

To study the swiftness of biology – the protein chemistry behind every life function – scientists need to see molecules changing and interacting in unimaginably rapid time increments – trillionths of a second or shorter. Imaging equipment with that kind of speed was finally tested last year at the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, or EuXFEL. … Read more Protein imaging at the speed of life

Omega-3 shows protection against heart disease-related death, without prostate cancer risk

Should you take omega-3 pills? Or try to have two to servings of omega-3 rich fish a week, as the American Heart Association recommends? It may seem a bit murky if you follow headlines about nutrition and health. That’s why researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute continue to research the potential benefits and risks … Read more Omega-3 shows protection against heart disease-related death, without prostate cancer risk

Bionic pacemaker slows progression of heart failure

In the UK alone, around 900,000 people are living with heart failure and almost 1.4 million have survived a heart attack. After such an event, pacemakers are often fitted to either speed up the heart or to overcome electrical conduction problems between different chambers of the heart. There is no cure for heart failure; its … Read more Bionic pacemaker slows progression of heart failure

3D printing, bioinks create implantable blood vessels

A biomimetic blood vessel was fabricated using a modified 3D cell printing technique and bioinks, which were formulated from smooth muscle cells from a human aorta and endothelial cells from an umbilical vein. The result is a fully functional blood vessel with a dual-layer architecture that outperforms existing engineered tissue and brings 3D-printed blood vessels … Read more 3D printing, bioinks create implantable blood vessels